Chapter 146824078

See chapter in newspaper

Chapter NumberLXXXVIII
Chapter TitleA DUMB COMFESSION.
Chapter Urlhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146824078
Full Date1886-04-23
Page Number1
Corrections0
Word Count761
IllustratedN
Last Corrected0000-00-00
Newspaper TitleThe Narracoorte Herald (SA : 1875 - 1954)
Trove TitleThe Master of the Ceremonies
article text Tike Ulaster oft the Cere monies. By Gr. Mahtieee Fene-. Author of . " The Bosbebby Foek," The Pabsoh o' Dumfobd," " Habdto "Wnr," "Eli's Chiedben," "The Vicab's People," "Dutch The Diveb,' &c. CHAPTER LXXXV1I1.—A Dumb Comtessioit. It was a momentary burst of fierce rage that was over directly; and, drop ping his hands and stepping back, the Major st->oA looking as Morton went on. " Taking advantage of the similarity of figure between himself and my un fortunate brother, he took Ered I)en- j ville's uniform one night for a disguise ; and to cast the suspicion upon an innocent man, should^he be| seen, and then went to the house and killed that miserable old woman as she slept." "You hear this mad charge, Hock ley ?" said the Colonel. "Yes, I hear," was the scornful reply. " Go on, Mr. Denville; I aid hound to hear you," said the Colonel. "What reason do you give for this impossible act." "Poverty, Sir. Losses at the-gkm ing. table. To gain possession of Lady Teigne's jewels." "Pish !" ejaculated Buckley with his eyes flashing. "Those jewels proved to be false," continued Morton," and at the first opportunity Major Buckley took them in the dead of night, and threw them from, the end of the pier into the sea." " How do you know that ?" said the Colonel. " I was on the platform beneath, fishing, Sir; and the fisherman I was with dredged them up afterwards, and sold them to Mr. Barclay." "Yes," said that individual. "I have them still." "Bah! Absurd!" cried Buckley, throwing hack his head. ■ " Colonel Lascelles are you going to believe this folly?" "I am powerless, Major Buckley," said the Colonel in a quick sharp manner. "This charge is made indue form." "And it is enough for me' sir," said the constable, stepping forward. "Major Boekley, I arrest you on the charge of murder." ■ Boekley made a quick movement towards the door, but stopped short. " Pish! I was surprised," he ex claimed, as the constable sprang in his way. " What do you want to do." "Take you, Sir." "What ? Disgraced like this I eried Buckley, furiously. " Colonel, you will not allow this insult to the regi ment, give your word that I" will' ap pear." "I am helpless, Sir," cried the old Colonel. " Place me under arrest then, and then I can appear in due time." " I claim Major Boekley as t iny prisoner, Sir," cried- the constable stoutly. "I have a warrant in proper form, Sir, . and :my men ane waiting. This is not an ordinary case." . " Oh, very well," crie t Buckley contemptuously,"! am ready. The charge is as" ridiculous as* it' -is dis graceful.' I presume, then; that I may return to my quarters and tell my servant to pack up a few neces saries?" " Of course, of course, Bockley," said the Colonel. " There can be no objection-to this." He looked at the constable as he spoke, but that individual made 110 reply. He placed himself by Bock-, ley's side, and Sir Harry Payne went out with them. " I don't believe * ik -Boekley," he cried.- " Here, I'll stand by you to, the bnd." : ! * Boekley gave him a grim nod, glanced sharply round and then strode out of the room to his own quarters only a few yards away. " "Well, gentleman," said the Colonel, looting from one to e other, "this is a inost painful business for me. Mr. Denville, as your father's son, I cannot blaine you very much, but if you had been ten years older you -would have acted - diff erently." " Colonel Laseellds," said Lord Car boro, eoldly. " I do not see how Mr. Morton Denville could have acted difE ently." \ "I will not argue the point with you . my lord," said the Colonel. May I ask you to—My God! "What's that!" It was a dull report, followed by the hurrying of feet, and the excite ment that would ensue- in a barrack at the discharge of fire arms. Before the Colonel could reach the door,- it was- thrown open, and Sir Harry Payne staggered in, white as ashes, and sank,into a chair. "Water!", he exclaimed. "I'm weak yet." "Whatis it? Are you hurt?" cried the Colonel. "Ho. Good heavens! How hor rible," faltered the young man with a sob. "Hockley !" " Bockley ?" died Morton ex citedly. "He Ws blown out his brains I"