Chapter 92761815

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Chapter NumberX
Chapter Title
Chapter Urlhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article92761815
Full Date1871-08-25
Page Number4
Corrections0
Word Count1051
IllustratedN
Last Corrected0000-00-00
Newspaper TitleNorthern Argus (Clare, SA : 1869 - 1954)
Trove TitleGood at Last
article text

GOOD AT LAST *

Bl "** PpEr.T.A

Chapter X.

After Tom sod Walter had l®ft Birkenhead, Isabel fand Kllen were more tfcrcjrn into «i»1i others so ciety tfeau, previously hfcd been the case. t«aba\ had frequently wondered at EBan'-s coldness towacdsAer, know ing l«traelf|ad gjen Urcwoae it7 -awtawnwmd if possible te put an end tftit, aad-*ith that in testwn Mid to her";one.*???»!_?$ *! sfcsr were-a&bng'-fcog«tfcCT-^ - -

^ EUeo,' dear, whatever ts the

matter with vou t You i»h»*« to- , wards me as.tbough I -had grt$frously .Wed iaKwri <*

know

you too weU to &* it Do. tell, iwtv, . what has caused your little temper to show itselfin-the *ulky way it has te-, wards me.**' r J'" ,ri

« There is nothing .that I know^ of which should -make nie' nfi^lcctfol of jou;" Ellen'#facebecomeirtdderttan naturally as. she answered. *l I like you as well as ever I did, Isabel; and it is a groat shame .tb^t you should accuse me ofiuiything inhospitable in my manner towards you.** "" "I

" There now; I^nlyspoke, and yon are out of jumper with me directly. Why, what a virtuous little goose you an; you can't even tell a fib without blushing over it j for I know that you are not speaking truth if yoiTsay that you feel no causefor estrangement be tween us. You ace always showing in some way or anothe^ how-much TOU wish that I werenot here. Iiet'a Be friends, ®Uen.-I think I can guess the reason of your coolness. Is it be cause your bro ther's frie nd prefers dark hair to light,?hecause he .prefers the society of an ordinary booking creature like nie to that of a pretty faced ifamnflT that I know of, whose chums should be efficient" to Win the most atony-hearfcediAdonis. ?'f

" This is'tipgeuerous-unkind. You should not talk sol How can I be jealous ? I'm 6ure J don't care for him, and Fm glad that he j likesyou. He's quite atliberty to please himself. Why should I oartt- I Itave ^refused. better oflfepp than he^ould mak£; for I should never care &>t any3n^e excppt pet cats and parrots. I'm cut out for an old

maid." """" °

" Old maid;* indeed. "That would ^ ahow you tflbe vefy<lifficult to please;1 for I really believe tiat na woman would die ina state of single blessedness, - unless she bad been somehow disap pointed^-cbiildn'ii liave some particular one *h«t 6he had thrown fcer nearfc at; You an old maid, Ellen; why, of.all tbe dear old crea^ur^s that are likely to maVo happj; homes, you are the dearest. After all thatpRUS^ I am sure you ought not to be badfriends-with me. As to the dear Walter; you can have him if it'sC uotlung but jealousy that has made you so cold towards me; since he -came here.. I don't thinklt will W me to give him up. r^ye Hpt weA made tip .toy mind yet as to. whether I shall Kke him at ati. .What! ,«rai»g=;. what have I said* or done/ now .?" - >

"Oh; I«abel; it's wrong, it's ac tually wicked, to think as you do--you havalistened tohnlove-maB^,andled. him to believe that you liked it; and now you speak of "giving him Hp, as if you had nfever encouraged 'his atten tions. Maiy. a fine^eart fc^befen crashed througha reojnan& opt ^speak-, ing aud acting honestly at first1, and discouraging wards^'herself ; which she,<^n^.i]et^n. " ,c ? x

« My goodn^s,® Hen; you seem to be speaking feelingly. J One/would,, think tbatjrflu MK:that jrame yourself. «I'm -half .afraid ...that. you'll dieiSj^d"m^dJ^^^L "Yoa'yd, made some-wne. Wfe&r ^ TWilloyf tor vou ; and now you want him hack

again.

Ellen's temper inow gave w^y; aid," .tarting up, she lookedass if ^ she could have eateri somebody, fes^e icried- .

" How dare yot^^;/jHill|^;.;

cay that t

my temper, and mnaosc apcusingiine of things that a woman shbuldie tishf

«f." V -. -*. ,J

" ForgiVfi inB^ I had no,-^o thought .f woundijigyolVlis.t app^r tp have done." _ 1 , , c

jind eoing up to^lfeoi the. speaker

PWher«ra«aaifei':iaist. -Ellen's

n&tura w«ls the Te verse ofi a sulky or sullen one, so the two mer&xoon. sitting

« As wheiilie'flnitrpuM sheep's eyeftRtmel, potcaring - much > for anyotie else, thought itrather

grand to be made lovja to by_ such an' .ligible. JBut had I suspeictei thatj(as I sow sriB'- you - must have been) he

Vitw lus c&jigt* Htui &e ^ver mkde love to youf* .

«Yes^' . /? " :

" And>you f^.v; . Sl ,{. /. ,,

? ' Doiaotait Ilia '

" Loving 'him' *lL <tbe time, op doubt. Yet, . with * admirable con Mtence, yqjiQomplaiu tbatl sbouldbe doingsomethin^-injtliBrsaiQB Bkyle" ^ .

" No : I didn'tlove Inm. lAt.limst,

i aon-t rnatr^- *r"< ;

" No; ofc^nr^^ot. "Btitwbenyou had senthim^w^joufoundtbatyqu hftd j tell me,v

"

" 3^en he sardy cannot /nave oiia^ged his. joind- suddenly. as to

te#s. fhave'seyeraj

iiis manner toffudg,

?orced."

?Wnaen<^mdrIoctiito|<MZsal. c^iib

WKntcnf.

" I wish I had never seen him."

suppose soj bufnever mind, we lt SOQU s^&fitf&er,fit3 i^ 'in eafrnest nowVand if jjot, jvoll tgftch^im t$a£

'!p ''*JTCUbettofc totaefl wM»the4dlow 'U1!

? . BetttBBaoajwjpi yg." -/sj; , y

[ "Batyou, Isabel.''?

That's all right. T don't care, I assure you, the least bit about him;

though perhaps. I should have dome ip . time, if you and I had not had this talk together. Your brother Tom seemed at first inclined to honor me with his notice, and your father ap peari&dhighly pleased tit thatj but!the jtVo^jjoung men suddenly changed places, Walter getting "quite poetical

towards me. I wonder whether I was invitedhere as a lamb to the slaughter;

if one* didn't like me another would be

'to take care ot by father's J

money.'"

1 '"".Don't ?so'l6ieAtrly'bf ufc* ? as* that; Mbfl.' My father v«ertainLy said that^both hesnd-Mr. Biliary ?would'like to see you andTommake "a

matdh of it. But Tom would rather refoain single-"

' ? ^ So He has given or sold his chance

pf a good match. I'll invent some plan . yefrio,-bring you all to your Benses."

. -When she'said that Tom had cither

fiven or told his'§hance of her hanjd, .

he litjtle knew bow near the truth she

was.--.- ? R- ?