Chapter 71708585

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Chapter NumberVIII
Chapter Title
Chapter Urlhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71708585
Full Date1884-06-21
Page Number1
Corrections0
Word Count545
IllustratedN
Last Corrected0000-00-00
Newspaper TitleNorthern Star (Lismore, NSW : 1876 - 1954)
Trove TitleDark Days: A Story of Light
article text

"j'' ', CHAPTER'VIII.

- ¡It waa about a week later that Richrrd Barry was seated in one of tho many sandy nooks between the rocks, bareheaded, and with a sad smile upon his lip. ' It was even, ing, and he had ' been listening for the lost hour to a' sweetly. attuned voice as May Sanctuary read to him, as she had been in the habit of reading to him during the past day or two. Half a mile away along the shore, Fred Lusmoro was walking with one ' leaning heavily upon the protecting arm that

supported hor, and from time to time they stopped, gazing out to sea, with the setting sun seeming to blond two shadows into one. It was very still in that far-off corner of eld

England, and as May looked up at tho strong well-built man beside her, her heart throbbed

loneliness, his weakness oven in his strength, for tho guiding power was gone, and through lifo he must be as helpless as a child. ''

? Sho could not restrain it ; the not was almost involuntary as she stole her hand into one of his, and in a moment, where all was calm and restful before, there was a wdnderous look of joy, and he held tho hand

there thinking of his tb his breast.

But for a moment ; and then with a ory of anguish as he threw it from him

"No, no, no I May, for heaven's sake, go? I was mad-cruel to you. God help me 1 ' Why did I let him bring me hore?"

. Then, groaning with anguish and despair, his eyes' staring wildly, he ro JO, and with outstretched hands began to hurry away, but only to stumble over a piece of rock and fall heavily upon tho sand.

I Ho was gathering himself up to flee again,

for he told himself it would boa sin, a crime against one so young and fair'; when he felt his hands taken, and a low gentle voioe that Boomed to thrill him through and through1 whispered- , u ; ? ? ?

; " Richard, i may I not lead you pow and always, through, our lives ? Knowing what I know, is it unmaidenly to say that ? if you will take me .for your.wife, I will be your, true and loving helpmate to the end ?" :

It was as if.light had flashed through the, blackest darkness, and in the sunshine of his great joy .Riobard Barry know that his blind ness was of the past ; that .henceforth there would be loving eyes to see, a gentle, hand to guide; and he stood there in the solomn silenco of .that ove olosping, tho hands, that nestled in his, his heart too., full' for words.

' Two years later ho wrote from Cornwall to

his friend.in town-. i . . /M>.. .....

! " Better and better ; tkero : is a : certain dimness still, but in a few months my blind ness will be all : over. ' > I can tell i our little May of my Dark Days when she is a woman grown.":,! i >' i.i . ?? < "ii': -? r.,.- Í