Chapter 65584319

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Chapter NumberXXXIV.
Chapter Title
Chapter Urlhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65584319
Full Date1883-08-07
Page Number0
Corrections0
Word Count1592
IllustratedN
Last Corrected0000-00-00
Newspaper TitleKerang Times and Swan Hill Gazette (Vic. : 1877 - 1889)
Trove TitleAdventures of Three Young Ladies
article text

ADVENTURES OF THREE YOUNG LADIES -o CHAPTER XHIIT. Glad of a change, the girls stepped out of their heavy vehicle and disportoed themselves on the grass. No one intruded on them but at no great distance they could see the waving sheen of the white cloaks worn by their chivalric attend ants. All conversed in low hushed tones. Hope is apt to make the humane heart beat so wildly as to almost check the power of words. All were eager hot flushed. Their eyes beamed with a strange radiance 'I feel as if something terrible were about to happen,' said therather superstitious Jesseeie. 'I can bear this stain upon mnyl nevoes but little longer.' 'I hope and trust,' cried Kate that we are at the end of our trial,, Lieutenant Montague,' At this moment one of theirfriends sauntered up behind an adjacent tree while the others kept watch. 'What do you propose to do ?' asked Mrs Bacon, if we are fortunate enough to es. cape. 'I mustto Malta to report the loss of my ship and stand a court martial. I wrote a full account from Gibraltar to thenadmiral but he may not approve of my turning knight erran and wandering about in search of distressed damsels,' replied the young naval officer trying in spite his deep anxiety to appear cheerful; bnt I came to warn you that the criss is at hand. 'Heaven what mean you. A cloud of horsemen are riding over the plain their spears flashing in the sun. At the right moment we will join you hold yourselves prepared and with these words he slipped away. 'Now good angels speed us cried Edith clasping her hands. How I tremble. 'Oourage my darlings We must do all we can to aid these brave men do not give way in the last hour of peril -above all no fainting, urged Mrs Bacon. No eastern women travel without sweetments and other refreshments. Mrs Bacon had secured a small flask cf m liquor, which is much used ins t he harem pungent flavonr and very swe e tening to th breath and of this she gave a small quantity to each of her charges. Mleanwhile Lionel joined his companions. The party of four including the moollah were under a cool and wide spreading palm. Their eyes were fixed upon the approaching I horde of Arabs of the desert. They came on slowly and cautiously as the moollah had adversed. He wished a surprise to take place and wholly prevent an excuse for bloodshed. Suddenly one of his swarthy attendants came rushing np. 'On my head be it he said there is a cavalcade approaching. IIy eyes have seen it said the moollah. '"No most wise ruler of men I mean not that hoveringband of robers but one close to us carrying the private standard oft the em. pire. Go said the moollah in a chocked voice say I am coming. 5 All is lost he gasped when they were alone Here and hewrote some lines with a pencil upon a peculiar kind of parchmenttablet y with to Sirdar Bey. But then is all over. Get back to'the capital as soon as possible go to John Bowon I have explained all to you Ashurst. Remain theIr until I come to you. To Morrrow night at least. And vaulting upon his steed he rode to meet the cavalry from Tangiers while the trio of dis appointed adventurers dashed over the plain in th e direction of the robbers. It was to true' Not a hundred yards distance appeared a troop of gorgeously-arrayed soldiers waving aloft the green and gold standard of the em peror. A solitary rider dashed forward to meet the moollah vinzr before whom he bowed low. 'O moollah our master sends you greeting. and has ordered me to escort you into the city,' said the swarthy officer a real Moor of the Othello description. 'Welcome Hnadji Bey,' replied the other, quietly my master always does me to much honour. He wishes the march to be hastened,' con tinued the other with as much animation as might have been shown by a statue, he is ans xious to see the giaour maidens safe in his zenana. As you bear his majesty's commands, give your orders, I obey. We will repose an hour, the heat will then have passed,' said the man addressed as Hadji Bey: The moollah shuddered. Something in the mans tone seemed to warn him that he was betrayed. If so he was a prisoner. But the cunning duplicity of Orienesal des potism would not allow a straightforward de mand. le must act wholly by a side wind. You will repose yourself and take coffee.he replied. 'I am your highness humble servant,' re plied the officer dismounting as the whole ra diant body rode up and camped at some little distance from the waggons. The moollah ordered a carpet to be spread under a tree and commanded the coffee makers without whom no eastern ever travels to sup ply them. The pipe bearers were also brough into re cition and Hadji Bey was soon in the seventh heaven. They conversed but little and of the most trival things. Shall I give orders for the march, asked the moollah in a hesitating kind of way. The officer looked at him with somethinglof surprise. I am wholly under your excellency's ordhrs said Hadji Bey. I came wholly to honour you. You and I have been friends for some years,' replied the moollah in a low tone. I thought the escort was a signal of disgrace. 'Of high high honour, said the Moor with dilated-eyes and speaking in such , tone of surprise as to relieve the mind of the high priest You relieve my mind from a great weight. To fall under his highncss's displeasure is a fearful misfortune. Accept this token of my friendship, said the moollah taking off a massive gold ehaln that hung about his chain coret. The swarth face lit up with a beam of ge nuine delight, The moollah then slipped away to give his orders. Glancing around he hurried towhere the maidens were croucted upon the carpet Mrs Bacon standing. Our plans are defeatedscattered to thetwinds he gasped but in the name of God have courasge.. I have one hope left-a terrible one but i shall be used. Be calm or remember I am rained. And he glided away to prepare the sleeping empress for the resumption of her journey. 'What did I say ? cried Jessie. I had fearful foreboding dreams last night. Born of anxiety my dear urged MIrs Bacon Dreams are the result of indigestion, as a rule sometimes of worry. Let us be calt explained Editb, Becollect what he said. Yes, whatever fate betides us let us have courage. Our friends have not deserted us. And with these words they entered their vehiele nd were drawn forward until a late hour when tents were erected and the whole cavalcade halted. By twelve o'clock next day they were once more within the hateful and g'oomy walls of rheo zenana. CIIAPTER xxxv. Again we stand in a splendid apartment of the imperial palace furnished and decorated with the utmost magnificenceand Asaitic splen dour.

The emperor !was seated on a couch eur. ) rounded by a canopy. Male and female slaves stood around. The emperor was smoking. Except for this he appeared far more a statue than anything else, All the rest imitated his immobility, Has the moollah been summoned?'he said at last. 'He is here your imperial highness,' replied the moollah in the full robes of his priestly office, advancing and bowing to the ground I await your highness's orders. The emperor waved his hands and all the at tendants, male and female. retreated out of hearing. You have seen and spoken with those three Feringhee girls he said coldly. By your orders. yes. And are they now aware of the great honour which is done them ?' said the monarch. They still pine for their native land and de', sire to remain faithful to their religion, was the quiet reply. 'Allah Kerim ! who ever heard of women having pny religion said the emperor with a gloomy frown. Have they become ugly. This was said by him in an entremly anxious tone. O moollab, it appears to me that you are faint hearted in this matter,' began the em peror in a cold and saturine tone ; I fancy that you show lukewarmness towards your adopted religion. I know the penality of such folly, was the cold reply. 'I am glad that you remember it, 'continued the other now hearken to the words of wisdom To night shall take place the betrotba' to morrow or the next day the actual marri-. age. Yes your highness.' Let the stars decide whi chof the two days bhut let no malignant influence interfere to delay my wishes said the despot significantly. Let the women dance. ' The moollah respectfully saluted his sove reign and withdrew as if in deep meditation to an alcove while the dances displaed theirantica before the sated tyrants. 'Enough,' he said after looking on with a bitter air 'their ir nanght amuses me now. At this moment an attendant entered with a white and terror stricken face. 'What ails the fool We have just taken a prisoner in the harem cried the other, kneeling abjectly. The moollah flushed crimson. Could any of the trio have risked themselves again. (To be continued.)