Chapter 62145589

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Chapter NumberXXVII
Chapter TitleJOHN BROWN HIMSELF AGAIN-DE WERT AND MADAM-LYNDHURST AT WORK AGAIN-FIRE AT THE LADIES' SCHOOL, SUNDA
Chapter Urlhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article62145589
Full Date1884-11-29
Page Number9
Corrections0
Word Count1178
IllustratedN
Last Corrected0000-00-00
Newspaper TitleClarence and Richmond Examiner and New England Advertiser (Grafton, NSW : 1859 - 1889)
Trove TitleJohn Brown and His Dog Faithful
article text

CHAPTER XXVII.

JOHN BBOWN HIMSELF AGAIN-DE WEBT AND

. MADAM-LYNDHURST AT WORK AGAIN-FUIE

AT THE LADIES' SCHOOL, SUNDAY NIGHT

LYNDHUBST AND THF-. 8EBGEANT-INQUUB'l', AND HOW LYMPH U HST ACTED AT IT-DE WEBT PONDERED.

Six months have passed away.

John Brown is himself »gain, thanks in a ver, great measuro to Aohates ; for Achates-the faithfu friend of ^Eneas, the hero of Virgil's -lEneld, wa never more firm and true than our hero's frleni AohateB,

He seemed to live but for his friend John Browi now. He could not forget the past-the horrid past but by neither word nor look did John Brown ad. to his grief. Yea, rather, laboured to cheer hira drew him close to himself, as only a man of Johi Brown's mind and powers could.

Hebe wo find once more at her scholastic work prosecuting her studies ¡ joy giving place to borrow

A more weighty, rioher, handsomer silver oollar with dato and suitable inscription of the old dog faithful action when his mastor was supposed to bi dead, was placed around Faithful's nock.

This was Aohates' gift,

Hebe would do something ; so she was allowed t< add a silver look, with an inscription of. her own " A noble dog, that has more brains, and know botter than many human beings,-H, HANDSLIP."

Tho old dog Faithful stood a good chance nf beinf placed on the saina footing as the King of Siam'i white elephant.

The old dog only blinked his eyes at the exoossiv« adulation he recoivod, as much as to say, " You know nothing."

Call not this verbioide, reader, for tho' tho New foundland could not speak, ho could and did mon

oxpresBively mather ways tell his mind and thought«

"Tell rae. Louis, if I caa help you in this mattor Let me help you, Louis; I have money saved, an< would gladly help you to repay this money you sa; you got possession of by false moans. ' Do, Louis, i was a false seep on your putt, fmut jias."

"No, no, Ledru ; dim conn ¡/ardo. I have acted 01 the square ever since I got the money, and have beer paying it book by instalments. I have now a goo< situatioa,'so by a proper course of self-denial on m; part I shall soon bo abio to pay tho balanoe of th, money, with interest. I told you, Ledru, tho losl timo wo met 1 would not join you till I hod, as fai as possible, redeemed my name hero ; and remember I have not yet dono all I fcol I shall have to do foi mademoiselle. Af tor I feel I havo done all I oan foi

hor, then mynoxt step will boto prove my innocono* in the Homo matter. You know! was most un j us tl j punished through tho falso swearing and machina' tions of tho guilty man, who ;was my enemy, Th< unjust stain must be removed from my name, J know I have a very mephistopheles to cope with ir

dearing myself, but I hold passe partout. . "Ah, Louis, -¿a hon temp« denara",,

" ' " Yes, Ledru, the good timo will come whon I shall bo able to walk the streets without fearing the gent d'arme». Yes, ilèiiaâemttHt";'????.>?'?? ~:--fJ1

' V' ,'Jfltái,mol i'll vousplait, Lonisj how will you dc it?" ? -,"v" y

" No, Ledru, not now. ' Komombor the Latin pro ¡verb, Deus cst,atti regit lulinia," -

"That is, Louis, there isa God who'rulcs all things ; or, in other words of our own tongue, Dieu tli'/eud lc "</»v>fi.',,.i,!.,,,"f"l,.::'v " '? '? :'? -v ?

' '"Yes,Ledru.".'¡I'

"But lot mo PSBist you to ropoy this money. My purse is yours.' ITrw nobly helped mein, daysgono by."

'" Tut, tut, dear Ledru. Whotovor I was abio to do for you twas but a-barren return, for your good mother's work,-; Never can I !repay > her ifor all hor góódrioss-,'to me." No, rio,-hó,''ma[Mn,1speak not again of that. But this money ¡ I nm .repaying was the last wrong doed I did-the Mst debt of tho kind I owe. .You should, Lodru, commend me for my act of self-denial, How can'I provo my rogrot other- wise. Not ono shilling do I upend on myself, beyond what necessity/compels mo. To take your monoy, Ledru would bo baso ; to uso your purso to ateno for mi/' guilt,' would bo tho deed-of u .crayon, spirtlcss, cowardly heart, I am noting in no spirit of'it work of supererogation. I think you know mo. too well to oven think I would ' act from such a lbw-' motive I know, if I woro putting tho mattor. boforo our good friend tho Abbe D'estrees, of Avoranchos, ho would commend my not. His words would bo,-You aro onlij doing your duty ; prove by full restitution aud self-denial your sorrow to niau, aud soek then pardon from a higher power, through tho divine channel, for your guilt. Such would bo tho words, J. know of tho good Abbó D'Estróes."

?i " You aro right, Louis! tako youl own oourso,"

" Yes, stainless I was, and would bo again, But,

Ledru, how you have changed in look, features, appearance, since wo parted I fuit doy at Home. I would have passed you u hundred times without knowing you. But you it Was who recognised mo. Truly, women's eyes are sharper than men's, Your gender leave the moBoulino in the baokgroum} spmo times in shrewdness, Women, at timos, ure not quite so harmless as tho little shrew-mouse. The death of

your sainted mother WOB a severe blow to you. Then,

before you properly realised the fact ot her death,. and surrendered yourself to the will of divine provi- dence unreservedly, you were called upon to undergo another lacerating wound in my nrrost, trial, and .final boforo tho bar of justioo, Mah, justice I Yos, dear Ledru,.I know you suffered keenly ipr mo. Mien, rous garde. Ah, well may you havo changed, altered almost boyond recognition.

" Ah, Louis, nt that Hmo every thing waa a tort et A travers j but it is past, let it be forgotten-buried in a chest of iron, till we return to England to prove your innocenoy, How is le bon mademoiselle getting on ?" .

" At present, well, tho' she has been called upon to pass through rt very floree fire of trouble ; but, like the Asbestos garment, BIIO has stood tho test and carno out a dazzling whiteness. Tho crisis was great in ono so young, but she has como out unsingud yea, unscorohed-in tho ordeal. It is not an auto- maton or an Autochthou I havo to deal with, but a crafty, cduoatod Briareus-a very lthadamanthus ; but tho time mill como if hep ho will have to Buffer tho, like; fata of Phaeton,'tho spn of Sol ¡ looting Jupiter, But enough, lot us talk of old times ; then I must away hook to tho city, and hie to my work," .

TO BB CONTINUED. , ( i