Chapter 57047511

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Chapter NumberXII
Chapter Title
Chapter Urlhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article57047511
Full Date1877-12-22
Page Number4
Corrections0
Word Count1457
IllustratedN
Last Corrected0000-00-00
Newspaper TitleAlexandra and Yea Standard, Gobur, Thornton and Acheron Express (Vic. : 1877 - 1908)
Trove TitleThe Prince and the Watchman: An Adventure on New year's Eve
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TfHE PIINCE AND T'IHE WATCHMAN. AN ADYVENTUI E ON N1EW YEAltti EVIE. (Fuo3 tts: G:anMAts). (Continued). CCuarrEu XII. As it usually happens where it loving couple fall out, so it happened between Philip and Rose. As soon as RInes turned her head sirde. and took out her handkerchief to dry her eyes, heaving sigh alfter sigh from the bottom of her hteart, she was evidently in the right; and he was evidently in the wrong. He begann to comfort her, and tic keowledge he was in the wrong, confess ing he had been .t a masked ball, and that what hle ihad under his arm was no woman's dress, but his silk domino, with the mask and plumtned hat. After this repentant confession, how ever, Philip had to go throuthl a severe examination. A masquerade Is at very dangerous field for defenceless hearts, as all the inhabitants of large towns know very well. There people ate plunged into ia sea of pleasant dinger, in which all but the very good swimmers soon sink. Rose did not think Philip one of the very best of swimmers, though it would be hard to tell why ; so he must first declare if lie lhad danced, and, on his denying, he must then say whether he bad had no affair or ad venture with female masks, which he could not deny. He confessed to several such adventures, but invariably added that all these ladies were noble, and had taken him for another person. Rose was in great doubt but, relpressed her suspicions. When, however, in answer to her questionst-whoml they had taken him for, and who lent hinl his masking dress-hobe always named Prince Julian, she shook her unbelieving little bead. Still more improbnble to her seemed Philip's story tihat the prince had done his watchman's duty while he was at the ball. At last iie sncceeded in removing her doubts by the assurance that the prince-for so lie held his substitute to ba-would be there in a few minutes, by appointment to exchange the watlcnllan's mlantle, horn, and baton lort his silk mnttle and plumed hat. The frightened Rose now got a new light thrown , ? her own adventure in the dark bouta-entry. It had even struck her at tihe timne that there was something strange about the pretended Philip. Now it was her turn to confess everything, and she sought for words, and stammered to such anct extent, that poor Philip was quite Irightened. When she came to the returned kiss, she ihesi tated very much ; but everything must come out. "It is not true!" cried Philip. "I neither gave nor got a kiss fomn you !" " Well, it was intended for you," said Rose, in ca very low soft voice. Philip was annoyed, and rubbed his hair to keep it Itom standing on endl. "Listen. Philip," continued the troubled Rose. '" If it weeas not you, I believe all the unlikely things you have told me, and it must have been the prince in your clothes " Philip had long ago guessed that. ' The rascal ! " le cried. ." He has stolen my kisses from you, Now I understand. It was only for that ho .gave me his mask ; only for that ihe wanted to persontute utle for half an hour." And now he remembered how the masked Dutchmnan had spoken to him about Rose at the ball. and hle renewed the examination more severely than before. Had she ever seen the prince before, and where ? Had she not re marked a man, a gentleman, following as she went to or came from church ? Or had he pretended bntaiiess in Milk Street ? Had ai gcntlcman, or tiny one, come to her mother to, acist her with money or presents in her widowhood ? Rose's answers to ill these questions irere so satisfactory, and bore so eotirely the stamp of the cmost touching in nocence, that Philip's heart got lighter He warned her against skulkers. and the pletended benevolence of nobles; end she, in retulrn, warned hll Imll itlet ,dangers of malsquerades, and adtventuttres with ladies of rnuk, by which marny young men have been tmade utterly wretched. They forgave each other till that they had committed in ignorance, and Philip was at the point of demand ing the kisses intended for hitm, but which he had not received, whlen just at this happy moment they were dis turbed by a stran?e occurrence. Running in full cireer, c man cetnme towards then and suddoenly stod still, breathless. By the hat, mnnrhtl, and horn, Philip knew his man; But Iulican sought Philip without finding him, is he no longer wore tie scarlet domino, and round plumed hat. " Noble air," aaid Philip, hIndintg him the bundle, "hcere ate your thiigs. We will never change pmcts in this world again. I should cote off too badly." " Quick, quick !" shoated tihe prince, as he threw off his uatcllsnlan's dress, wrapped himself in his mantle, and put on his mask and bet. Rose sprang buck, frifgltered. Philip put on his old cloak atlnd Ihit and took up his baton and Ihorn. " I promised you c present, comrade," said the prince, sorrching his pockets; " but as sure as I live 1 have not got my purOe." Here it is," said Philip ; i you gave it to my betrothod, Burt. noble sir, we don't eccept such presents." " Keep what you've got, comrade, and get off us fast its you caln. YolU are not safe here !" criedl the pirintce hastily, and was going caway. but Philip hold him fast ly the manttle. " Noble sir," said he, " we have still sometlhing to settle." S"Fly, I toll you ! fly, watchmann ! They are after you," usaid the prince. "I have no reason to fly, noble sir'." replied Philip,,; " but I have here your p tree to I'Keeop it, and run as Tat nas you can,"

said the prince. " And a cheque of Maorshal Illaken sbchwerd's for five tlhOmand florins to give von,' continued Philip. "Zunrds! how came you nnd the marshall toge.ther, wiichainll' " de mandeil the prince. " II, said it wot a debt of honour that hI wished to pay before setting off to-night with his landy, for their estate in Poland," replied Philip "Are you mad ? " said the prince. "How do you know anythiiig about thatI Where did he give you this mess;ige to ne? " " Gracious prinee," continued Philip, "the Finance Minister, ot toinless, will pay all your debts to Levi and Goldchnmidt, if you will tako him into favour, and grant him your influence with the king, that lie may retain his place in the ministry."-" Watchlman! are you posessed by the Evil One 1" " I have refused it, however, in your Higlhness's nmme." " You i refused the minister?" Yes, gracious prince," replied Philip. " On the other hand, I have completely reconciled tiOe Counerss Bones with the Chambnerlain Pilzow " " Which of us has lost his wits ?" exclaimed the lprinco. • " One thing more," said Philip, "The Duke Herman is frightfully enraged against you on accountof the cellar affauir. He wanted to complain of you to the king." " Who ! the duke ? How, then did you leatn all that?" " The duke himself told me, your Royal Highness. You aret not safe It is true he no longer thlreiltens to corn, plain to the king, heeanue 1 frightened him with the bond lie gave the ibaker girl. But now le insista on a mortal combat. Take cure of yourself." " Tell me one thing, watchman ? Do you know how the duke learned that I- " " He learned everything from the wife of MnrehIl ll lantkensehwerd," re plied Philihp. " She has confessed every thing to him,-even thintshe played the witet, in the cellar." '' You are a merry wag." Said the prince, taking Philip Iy thei arm, " but no watchman." But turuln r his lace t, wards a distant hlmp, he started, and looked astonished at the entirely un known man; then, suldlenly ,sied by the shock of surpriae, lie added, " Are you possessed by the Evil One, or- who are you then ? " " I nmt the gardener, Philip Stark, son and successor of the wtllchmtua Gottlieb Stork," rephed Philip, quietly. (To be continued.) A young lady of New York, who is par tially deaf, is in the habit of answer inc "yes" to everything wh.n a gentleman is talking to her. for fear hie might propose to Ihef lnd she not huar it.