Chapter 39431392

See chapter in newspaper

Chapter NumberIV
Chapter TitleIMOGENE
Chapter Urlhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article39431392
Full Date1888-01-11
Page Number4
Corrections0
Word Count463
IllustratedN
Last Corrected0000-00-00
Newspaper TitleCairns Post (Qld. : 1884 - 1893)
Trove TitleHand and Ring
article text

CHAPTER IV.

IMOGENS.

"You are a riddle, »He yon »ho eau."-Kaowlea.

Mr 0reutt was a man who for minv

j ears had turned a deaf ear and a cold

eve to the various atrractious and he guilcmeuts of woman Either from natural coldnesss of disposition, or for some other latent cause, traceable perhaps to some fact in his pastlustoi}, and not to be enquired into b) gossiping neighbours and so called friends, he had resisted, even to the point of disdain both the blandishments of acknowledged belles and the more timid but no less

pleasing chirms of the sin, countiv misses that he met upon his travels

But one du this was changed, Imo gene Dare inteied Ins home, aw ikin tug a light in the dun old place th it melted his heirtand made a m in out of nli.it was Usuill) consideitd a well

ordered m »elimo

¡she had been .1 foundling Yes, tin» beautiful, disdainful, almost command- ing woman, hud in the beginning been that most unfortunate ot beings-i t'u'd without a name But though this fait may lime iiifliieniiul ,liei ni carl} du«, it uradualh disippeartd from uotiic as she giew up nul de veloped, till in ¡sibley it li 1st it i.lint vitllnigli a fait foigotten Utr beauty, as well as the imposing ti nts of lui character, was tho i.iuse There aie some persons so gifted with natural force that, once brought m contact with them j ou forget tlitir antecedents, and indeed even thing hut themselves alone Eithtr their bciutv overawes vou 01 they, hy conversation or bearing, so completely s itisfy von of their right to vour respect tint in

fituitiou takes the pine of tunositv, and you juld your ng.nu .is if jon hid alnadv vielded vour uliuirition, without i|ucstiou and without stint

'1 lie carh ^cars ot her life weit passed ni the house of a pool widow, to vv horn the appearance of this child on her dooi step one line day had bein no thing more nor less than a veritable godsend First, because she was her self alone in the world, and needed the mingled companionship and care which a little one lnnarialih gives, and, secondly, because lmogenc, from the very first had been a notice able child, who carl) attracted the attention of the neighbours, and led to many a substantial evidence of favour from them, as well as from the strtiigtis who pissed tlpir gitt 01 frequent d tlitir church lnscu-ibty to mrs' If, and without help of iirium st nins or rearing, the girl was a magnet toward which all good things inseiis bl) te ided , uni the widow «aw this, and, «bile reaping the renard, stinted neither her affection nor her gratitude

TO BE <o*n\UF»