Chapter 33156512

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Chapter NumberXIII
Chapter Title
Chapter Urlhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article33156512
Full Date1898-03-25
Page Number62
Corrections0
Word Count600
IllustratedN
Last Corrected0000-00-00
Newspaper TitleWestern Mail (Perth, WA : 1885 - 1954)
Trove TitleThe Wealth of the West
article text

- - 'f*ä

CHAPTER XIII. "j^s

'Bates let a long wreath of smoke out ..agi of Iiis lips. - :..V^

"Well, Frank, taking the thing all

round, you have some cause for railing--'r-fM at fate. It was rough, there is no doubl»/ ' iff and after all that time too." r':"^t1¡p

They were sitting in their rooms. ':~9~t¡0,

Oonyers looked down in dejection.

"It sickens me, Bates.. I do not know that I am any more weak-minded than? other men, but it makes me feel like

giving up everything. The heai^i; ^^ knoweth it own bitterness, and you ~do';:C?||¡ not know how exceedingly bitter hu£e||flï is. You do not know-no other nuiiil^Q but myself can-what hopes I had buUtiC-llj up-what fears I imagined I had JrafcJ^j^ behind. And now all the fears ;iin-S^|l horrors are back again, «and ^t»e-'r.p?$È hopes-" ; ? .

" Are where most men's go to in iho/J^M long run, dear boy. Man is born to}f ^1§| trouble as the sparks fly upward. NoE-vl/fl much consolation in that, I suppose, but' ^ it ÍB the truth, and we may .as well u¡M knuckle down to it. But .it's easy for

the third man to talk-it s like bearing . ; ;| another man's toothache. Go on, hava . -il your say out." .r¿

"I think I felt as near, going mad as ..^Ix

ever I did when she said those' Vords,

I know how true they were." 1 "

" How true they may seem. Toa " ^ know nothing of what happened thai ^îllf night." . ' ' '"'M

He looked up gloomily. ' /fi " Do I not P I know more than you-í SI think.". ."r^M

"Contrariwise, my dear boy, you

think you know more than you do." * -r-^i*

" Don't trifle, Bates-I can't stand it." ^ "I am not trifling. On the contrary, y, I have been very busy. I saw Scotland Tard to-day."

Cónyere looked up wearily. í;"fÍ " I don't suppose it matters very much ^ Bates, but you have done the most fatal ? :-|| act of your life. That ends it." ?

'*I hope it will-that's what I meant : ?|

it to do." ?!

" Do you know what you have done P " í,° " Tes. I have put the cleverest people

in the world on the track of the man

who did the deed that night."

" Tou have, and that man was myself."

" That's what the lady thinks." ~ " It is what I think too."

"Tou talk at random. I have th» most certain means bf knowing that you

could not have been the man. We won't .,. f-¿, go into detail, but I know that you were ^ safe till morning when I left you that

uight." ' :7|

" Tou knew I was safe till morning! Bates, when we are sick in body our

friends pity us, and can put their pity ji into words; when our mind fails us it is ;'>f; ; part of the horror of the thing that whew

we recover, the nearest and dearest, eveifct l>^~ss can never refer to it again. It was so"

with us. We have never mentioned it ?

since. 01d,man, those who are mad ar* -

cunning-you see I have not much. £j reticence on the subject now-I have . f~é never told you all'I know. ïîow for the^'M first time I am going to. Tou remember -

I struggled with you for the key, buti6 ,\ ; -f| was part of my cunning that--?" '~:v~¿r¿

(To be Continued.)