Chapter 31165461

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Chapter NumberXXII
Chapter TitleFABIAN AND ROSE.
Chapter Urlhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31165461
Full Date1892-02-27
Page Number4
Corrections0
Word Count502
IllustratedN
Last Corrected0000-00-00
Newspaper TitleQueanbeyan Age (NSW : 1867 - 1904)
Trove TitleFor Cora's Sake
article text

hAPTeR ' XXIT.-FABiTA AND ROSE. W'What do you mean ?' ' I should rather ask what do you moan, or rather what did you mean, by daring to mnarry any honest man, and of all men Aaron Rockhnrrt ? Itt was the most audacious challenging of destruotion that the most reckless desprado. could venture upon.' Fabian continued mercilessly : ' Do you know what, if Mr. Rocklharrt were to dimcover the deception you put upon him, hlie miglit do and think' himself justified in doing to you ' " Rose shuddered in silence. 'The very least that he would do would he to turn you out of his house, without a dollar, and shut his doors on you forever. Then what would become of you.? Who would take you in ?' ' Oh, Fabian I' she soreaoned at last, ' Do not talk to me so. You 'will. frighten me into hysterics.'

)ruu wi!l precipitati I,h1 t t. . lstropht LI?aL y',, l fe.r. B uiet, 1 heg yu, sai, Mr F:-1hia . cowpose'lly, putti;!. his thu:hs in hii v?i.A puckets ;il lr ;ui t:U I, . Uh l ~itr i I i I.. i-. ?! "f t,!i: ":?'. , _ I' i nuL h Ctu mary v ,tri. fitht.,r. i w - i."' ',,jt t 7 ?u . -. ft ..y n ,.owh ,` til01.1? i y :ii will itkn ?wl le;dgeth.±t you " not quite good enough.to na:rry any hone:.t man,' said Fabiain, coolly. ,-. ':Yet you asked me to marry you.' ' Beg pardon, miny dear. I think the asking was rather on the other side. I wais sorry for you, and generous to:you.. I gave you the use of a pretty, little house, and- a sufficient income during good: hehaviour. Bus-you were'ungrateful to me, :Rose. You were unkihd to me.' ' I was not..- I would have married you. I could not do: more.' ' But, my dear, your good sense must have told you that I could not have marriedd you. I have done the best I could by you always. Twice I rescued you from ruin. Once wheii you were hut little more than a child, and your boy-lover, or husband, had left you alone, a young stranger in a strange lan.l- a girl friendless, penniless, beautiful, and sHi iii deadly peril of perdition, I took you on your own representation, and introduced ybu into my own. family as the governess of my niece. I became'responsiblo for you.' ' And did I not try my best to please everybody 1' sobbed the woman.

' That you did,' heartily respondeds Mr. Fabian. ' And everybody loved you. So that, at the end of five years' service, when my niece was to enter a finishing school, and you were to go to another situation, you took with you the best testimonials from my father and mother and from the minister of our parish. But you did not keep your second situation long.' (To be continued in our next.)