Chapter 2547448

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Chapter NumberNone
Chapter Title
Chapter Urlhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2547448
Full Date1839-04-02
Page Number4
Corrections0
Word Count1037
IllustratedN
Last Corrected1970-01-01
Newspaper TitleThe Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842)
Trove TitleThe Murdering Banker
article text

TÏÏE MURDERING BANKER.

(From Blackwood'! Magasine for December.)

. (Continued from our last.) -

Vet liiere were obstticies-insurmount- able -obstacles, winch resulted partly from the determined discountenancing of anything of the sort by Mr. Poarie, -partly from the unconquerable mo- desty of the youngman-and principally from the apparent indifference, if, in* deed, it was not altogether disliko, of the young lady. So poor Charles con- tented himself with loving her with all bil heart and all bis soul in secret bearing her sing and speak every even- ing that he possibly could ; and dream ing of her all night-a mode of proceed- ing which «II who have tried it unite in Erenouncing 'very unsatisfactory. A

ouse, at ihe other sid« of the town, prettily situated on the bank of the viver, reminded bim continually, by its «pacious aise, so disproportioned to the necessities of a bachelor-of that very pleasing text which says man was not

meant to live atone. What to him were the shrubbery wirilia-the long suites of rooms, the green-bouses and conserva

tories ?-Poor feUowJ not all the gram auarians, since the da) s of Prisoian downwards, could bare convinced him of the congruity of the substantive "?'blessedness," with the adjective "sin- gle."--" Dolilio," in the Latin, be recollected, was always io the plural «number,-and be considered the Ro- wans a -very sensible people. What a pity, that in those «lays, the march of -iniud was not -sufficiently advanced to ¿Make it imperative on the ladies {and especially on Mary Peat) to understand 'Xutin ! ' In these, and similar vain re- grets, time wore en. Mary smiled and sang as -charmingly as ever, and Mr. Peter Pearie-lue beed o' the boose .grew in fat and dignity with each re- volving moon.

One September, while affairs con- tinued in lliia state, the bouse on the opposite «ide of tho street from Mr. <?Pearie's gave symptoms of some won- derful change. Its windows were new .glazed, and pretty silk curtains hung ground them; the door was new painted ; paperers and other decorators at full ?work ; aud a long row of handsome '«tabling roofed and (finished in the lane at the other eud of the premises. Fur »niture shortly aller arrived; grooms und horses followed in due course; anti .large volumes of smoke were seen ris- ing from morn till night from the nwu dberless chimneys. Still lhere was no appearance of any inhabitant above the crank of a housekeeper-aud it was only when the bunting season lind fairly .commenced, that a view was occasion- ally caught of a young man, dressed in » red coal, who galloped off trom the tloor ou anactive hackney in the morn- ing, or walked his jaded hunter slowly up the lane in thouiternoou. Unless on these occasions nothing waa seen of ibeir new neighbours. And conjecture, after exhausting itself to discover who the mysterious stranger could be, fell fast asleep, and took no notice ot bim, either as be scoured along to covert, or glided noiselessly home to the stable. That be was handsome nobody could deny, who saw beauty in whiskers and moustaches of preterhuman size ;-a back <of piodigious leugth, very thin legs, an upright seat on horseback, jind a countenance of an impassive gravity worthy of <a monk of La Trappe, suggested no slight reminis- cences of Don Quixote-but the pa- rallel wa« by no means sustaiuable in .the article of horse-flesh, fcrit would -bave been difficult to believe that Ho «inante belonged to the same species .with the " souls made of fire, and ?children of the «un," who pawed the ground impatiently, and showed their pure Arab blood w every toss of their »lordly uiaues, as they waited fu« their master, and neighed proudly as he made -bis api-earance.

Jn the -tirst place, Charles was well «ware of Mary's insane admiration of /that noble animal the horse; in the next place, not even the vanity of a proprietor could blind him to the fact, that his little grey galloway could bear no «ort of compansou with the poorest lisckney in the new-comer's stud; in the third place, he felt sure that ad iuiration, once excited, is very expeu «ive ia its character, and he thereiore »concluded that it was highly probable that the manifest liking whioh Mary bad taken Wxthe Joug-tailod barbs, would impercepliby widen and widen (like rings in water), till at last included the long-whiskered owner of them iu its circumference. And what was be to doto avert this calamity ?-Buy a horse of surpassing beauty, and conquer the rival at his owu weapons ? Alas i John Laing sent bim from Edinburgh a descendant-of the Godolphiu Arabian, which bad every excellence that a bono «ouId possess, -except the trifling one of allowing a saddle to be put on bis back-and to complete his discomfiture, the high-born iulruder lett tokens ot bis remembrance among all who had the pleasure of his acquaintance during Iii« week's sojourn at the Dene (so was Charles's villa called) ; for before John Laing's man, bad been recalled from the capital to lead the new purchase home ¡again, it had broken two of Andrew Ol evins' ribs, and lamed the grey Gallo |wuy, by a kick on the bind leg. De-

prived of the services of Andrew ^fevin, rho bad been groom to one or other ol the partners beyond the memory of man,

ind also of those of the grey Galloway,] Chailet exhausted himself in imagining]

»thor tueauB of gaining his object ; anti, j like all other people excelling in the ¡imaginative, he went on buildiug castles in the air,-wishing, hoping; fearing, sud-doiug nothing.

" I maun gang ower and ca' on the new occupier," said Peter Pearie one klay to hu ward ; " it'« no right to let 'the lad live aae much by himsel'. Our

!»ank was aye hospitable to a' comers, ¡and I feel it my daly,' as heed o' the

»ose, to ask bim to bis kail."

" Q¡ I'm so delighted to hear you say Iso," said Mary, " 1 have been wishing it lfor »ucb,a tin|e,--Jtwill be delightful J" ? ''' ' \ ('To bt.càûtimtêd.) "