Chapter 111168565

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Chapter NumberX
Chapter TitleENOWERA
Chapter Urlhttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article111168565
Full Date1863-10-31
Page Number1
Corrections0
Word Count1478
IllustratedN
Last Corrected0000-00-00
Newspaper TitleThe Newcastle Chronicle and Hunter River District News (NSW : 1859 - 1866)
Trove TitleCivilisation; or, Dark Scenes in Australia. A Tale Founded on Fact
article text

CIVILISATION; OR, DARK SCENES

IN AUSTRALIA. A TALE FOUNDED ON FACT.

Bv Etienne— Author nf 'Hough Yarns from the Bush,' ' Colonial Skctohw.,' '? W« m tho South.'

? --'UHAPTISK X. KSOWEftA.

She was a daughter of die wild— A chieftain's fair and only child. Hemler, we linvo liglnly skipped over. t\velve months, and now we must retrace our steps to the two (eruulcs nnd their children, left to the tender meroy of their captors, with but faint hones of being able to escape

from tho terrible position in which they were placed. The white residents, or, out onsts, who had cast their lot with abor^i nt\ls — with one exception — ovinced little determination of rendering them any assist anoe. This young man (Jurnes Thompson) still evinced leelings of kindness — feelings such as no lessons learned in u savage camp could shake. Extreme caution was ueces sary for him to carry out the plans ho had formed, lust he should be thwarted ere they were accomplished. Well lie knew they watched him— I said thej, and by this I mean all that large host, including even his white companions. — No do/ibt the inhabi tants of these settled parts who may favour this narrative with perusal will at once cen sure these fiendish white meni nnd deem them little more thau brutes. Their pur pose was not bloodshed : nil they desired was, that ihe females now in their power should become their paramours ; but when they found the soul of virtue still agitated the breasts of these unfortunates, they cared not to protest against all that hud been, or wns yet to be done. Chary of their own interest, and fearful of offending tho chiefs of the tribe, they silently winked at the wicked actions of their sable brethren. Old Mon glo waited for revenge; the messenger had sped on his errand, and the night whioh was to close the oareer of these unfortunate fe males was at hand ; but Mackamvondn, or, Thompson, had resolved they should not be sacrificed to the brutal lusts of the savages; and as the fatal night drew near, he became uneasy, lest Borne fiendish resolve should' overturn his well laid plan for their escape. Thoughts ofhis childhood days, his mother and sister, nnd the love thoy bore him ere he had strayed from tho paih of duty to that of crime, came up in his mind, and there seemed an angel near pleading with thnt bold spirit ns if to bid him hesitate no tnoro in doing right. A loud shout broke his reverie ; it wns followed by another still louder, and then the wholo of the encamp ment, including tho whilo men. pressed for ward to tho spot where a tnll blaok wns standing. Itwas the messenger, nnd Mon glo was near him. Tho night wns dark nnd windy, but the largo fires burning in all di rections mado every object olenrly discorn nble. News from afar hud arrived, nnd iho old ohief having hoen privntely informed of its purport, stood forward, and thus .ad dressed the assemblage :— ' Brothers, my son is dood I tho young emu ia gono to tho land of sloop; what ono among you does not remember him ; and Loanah, Mio died, and I was loft with Enowera to oheer my heart in mine old ago. I have mournod for him, nnd he came not; T sought him in the bush, nnd he was not, he was foremost in hunting ; nnd when our young men return

at night he is not with them ; what shall I do for my son ? my son ?' A paroxsym of grief here interrupted bhn, when he ngnin resumed — 'VVhon our warriors nent to battle, in the thickest of the fight he was there; nnd who bent back ihe Bald Head v'44) like he T the tonor of «he natives fl*d before the young emu, for ho was mighty in strength nnd terrible iii anger, but ho fell before the fire-sticks of our white foes ; they hnve killed him, nnd lie now lies in the' sand on tho sea shore; our maidens mourn him; where is the eye. that is not wet with tenrs when they think of him ? Our corroboree iires (40), and full moon feasts, where are they since he left us. Let us have vengeance for liis death ; the pale faced women are hero ; my brothers are si lent, is it well?' A pause ensued, during which young Thompson crept softly to the camp of the ciptives nnd cut the thongs which bound their hands mid feet. 'Off with yon both at once,' said he, ' thero is not a minute to lose, the wretches will be here directly; to-morrow night the new moon makes its appearance, take your di rection constantly from that luminary, and keep towards the coast; avoid travelling by day, and ere long you will have sufficient light to prosecute your journey without fear of interruption. Here is n bundle contain-, ing provisions/' ndded he, giving them some knnguroo flesh, damper, &c, together with n flint nnd steel to make fires; ' now start at once ; as for me, I must return, as they would miss my presence, and besides, I can assist you no further.' ' My child .' my child!' said Mary, 'where is he? you have little Tommy. Clara, but, oh ! where is mine, oh, mine?' ''Leave him to me,' said the white man, 'M will find nnd res tore him to you8ome dny; really, you must stay no longer, or nil I have done will be useless.' Heart-broken at leing compelled to leave even one of their liittle ones in the hands of their savage foes, unwilling to de part without it, and likewise loth to stay., the terrified females pressed the hands of their preserver, bade God bless him, and then with tho speed of deers, who know that bloodhounds seek their lives, they .flew, rather than walked, along the path wliich led to the coast, where, ere long, they guined il.e covert of some rocks ; here they paused to recover breath, and consult over their truly unfortunate but novel situation. The distant yells of their pursuers, made them tremble in their concealment, until at length, as they took a new route, the shouts seemed gradually dying awny. All was then still, savo the Bplnshing waves us they broke in surf on the land, or the shriek of the sen mew, as it came in to its home from the waste of waters o'er which it had wan dered. Morning dawned, and by tho first light they resumed their journey. Tho old chief still addressed the assembly, and in formed them of his sanguinary resolution. It is but justice to the white men to state, they did protest against his proceedings ; mid evon his daughter, Enowera^ or, '-berfa- tifnl flower,' as she was called, joined (hem in pleading against the cruel measures ho wished to ndopt ; but finding argument and eutrenty alike ineffectual, they remained si lent, as he ordered the captives to be brought before him. Who can describe the rnge of those savnges when tidings reached (hem of the escapu of these poor females ; with ono accord, actuated by one impulse, they rushed to their camp, but it wns empty. Yells and shouts rent the air, and madness nppenred to take possession of-their hearts, ns in tho height of passion they cut them selves with pieces of glass and stones, and danced their war dnnce ns though they were about to bnttlo with some great foe, and uot with two defenceless women ; but they escaped, none soomed to know how, or whi ther, they and their children — stay, no ! it is one little child, which tho mother in her hurry could not find; she had sought it in vain, till she dured delay no longer ; and there it was sleeping in innocence, uncon scious of ill. Oh what fiendish exultation filled tho breas's of those sanguinary beings as they raised their spears nnd tomahawks to kill tho poor helpless little being, when Enowern, rushing forward, threw herself bo Corc those murderous weapons, and, snatch ing the child, bore it in triumph to her camp. The baffled savages stood back with uwe at her daring; and, however willing they might have heen to stay her progress, none stepped forward to do so. Silence reigned in that encampment ; all was still, save the great bush, ns tho crackling sound of the-brushwood with the frighted animals flung past, told that those blood- thirsty beings were still vainly seeking their prey. Let us pauso here, reader, and follow the fugitives. ( To be continued.)